Globalization/Empire


Business Insider

Qatar is purchasing $11 billion in Patriot missile batteries and Apache attack helicopters from the United States, according to AFP. It’s the largest single sale of U.S. weaponry in 2014, and it’s to a country with only 278,000 citizens (and about 1.5 million expatriates). (more…)

von J. Appelbaum, A. Gibson, J. Goetz, V. Kabisch, L. Kampf, L. Ryge

The investigation discloses the following:

  • Two servers in Germany – in Berlin and Nuremberg – are under surveillance by the NSA. (more…)

Germany announced Thursday it is canceling its contract with Verizon Communications over concerns about the role of U.S. telecom corporations in National Security Agency spying. (more…)

Guardian U.K.

Human rights groups seeking to confirm the use of a British overseas territory as a US secret prison have uncovered evidence previously undisclosed to the government confirming that more planes were involved in the extraordinary rendition of terrorist suspects around the world than had been admitted. (more…)

President Barack Obama asked Congress on Thursday for more than $65 billion to support the war in Afghanistan and global security programs, but key members of Congress say they won’t rubber-stamp the request and are frustrated at having been kept out of its preparations. (more…)

Critics unite to demand his sacking as Quartet’s envoy as evidence emerges of his private business interests expanding in region (more…)  See also Guardian U.K.

William Rivers Pitt Truthout

I wrote my first article on the folly of an Iraq invasion in August of 2002. There are no weapons of mass destruction in Iraq, I argued. There are no 9/11 connections in Iraq. There is no al Qaeda presence in Iraq, because Saddam Hussein was notorious for hanging Wahabbists from the nearest available light pole. An invasion would tear the country apart, explode sectarian tensions, and plunge the region into chaos. (more…)

Democracy Now!

The New York Times revealed the U.S. ambassador in Iraq, Robert Beecroft, and the State Department’s top official in Iraq, Brett McGurk, recently met with the controversial Iraqi politician Ahmed Chalabi, who has been described as a potential candidate to replace al-Maliki. Chalabi is the former head of the Iraqi National Congress, a CIA-funded Iraqi exile group that strongly pushed for the 2003 U.S. invasion. (more…)

Next Page »